Category: Gifted Education

5

More Than Outside The Box

After I created this poster, I thought, gee, that poster is overwhelming visually. So many details, crowded together, in so many different styles. Then I realized. It’s finished. This? It represents to me what gifted is. I was trained just like everyone else as a teacher, I got the one paragraph in my undergraduate program in my “Exceptional Child” class, that the professor skimmed over. We never even discussed it. The lack of understanding? It starts right there. A lack of education, professional development, and time spent even exploring it. The very word “gifted” can be misunderstood. A gift? It’s...

0

A Typical Day Should Include Stretching For All

Take a typical lesson, on a typical day, in a typical classroom.  We are constantly reaching out to the learners who have fallen behind. Tutoring. Intervention. Extra Time. Small group.  Individualized Instruction. Scaffolding.  All of these things are so important, and we’d all agree, essential for the success of students who need the extra support. But doesn’t every kid need support?  What about the kids who already know it?   Maybe they learned it on their own, got it really quickly,  or read about it once before.  They think differently.  Should they wait to learn?  What will be done differently...

1

Limitless

It was inspiring to hear Temple Grandin speak at the Texas Association for Gifted and Talented Conference today. Their theme this year? “Gifted and Beyond.” Beyond indeed. Beyond the label. Beyond your perceptions. Beyond what you think you understand. Temple Grandin inspired me because I see success. I see someone who found her place in the world, inspiring others to think differently about autism, and about kids who are different. Her passion for agricultural science led to her earning a doctorate in the field. Today? She gave hundreds of educators insight into how learning is different for her. A difference...

1

A New Measure of Success

I can remember slipping my stack of disheveled worksheets from my classroom mailbox each week when I was about eight.  It was a week’s worth of activities, ready to take home to my parents.  I’d thumb through them.  Looking carefully at each grade the teacher had written.  Scanning the stack for anything less than an “A”.   To see a B? It just wasn’t acceptable to me.  This pressure? It didn’t come from my parents, it came from me. A pressure that I kept up, all the way through school.  High school? It was easy.  I had settled in to...